“Today, in our field, there is so much talent and recognition that we are reaching a saturation point. An artist should no longer strive only for breathtaking craftsmanship; he should, instead, try to help us live better, either by dressing the wounds that are constantly being opened by society, or by offering solutions to get us out of the mess we’re in…But it’s going to be difficult and we have a lot of work to do.” - Jean 'Moebius' Giraud

Tuesday, June 08, 2010

SAMURAI & DRAGON_commission




I'll get to a proper update with all the images of the commissions I did while I was at HEROESCON this past weekend, as well as some cool things that happened during our four day stay. But for now here's a colored commission piece I did for a guy who picked it up at the show. The image is done with COPIC markers with Pitt Artist Pens for some of the contour and outlines.

Also, here's something I learned in doing the image: Chinese dragons have five claws. Japanese ones have three.

Now, I don't know if that's at all true. JON TSUEI is the one who busted out that little factoid. But please keep in mind, Jon also comes into my house, switches all my toilet paper around so it dispenses the wrong way, and eats my cereal. What I'm saying is, take all what I've just said with a certain grain of salt and please consider the source.

More later. For now - enjoy.

10 comments:

Comix Book Gurl said...

love it!

and i learned something about dragons :)

Chris Sims said...

Awesome as always, Eric! Is this colored with copics?

Pat Bollin said...

It was awesome watching you draw this weekend, and a pleasure chatting too. I didn't get a chance to see you work in color. Do you lay in the color first and then lay down the black ink on top, or the other way around?

Thanks,
Pat

Daniel.Z said...

It's gorgeous.

... and I'm curious to which direction of TP dispersal is your correct way...

Jonn Wood said...

And Korean dragons apparently have four.

http://www.guy-sports.com/humor/christmas/chinese_trivia.htm

Alexander Kramer said...

According to Wikipedia (read: take with a larger pinch of salt), there was a ranking system for dragons and talons:


The first Ming Emperor copied the Yuan ruling and decreed that the dragon would be his emblem and that it would have five toes (or claws) The four-clawed dragon was typically for imperial nobility and certain high ranking officials. The three clawed dragon was used by lower ranks and the general public (widely seen on various Chinese goods in Ming Dynasty). The Long, however, was only for select royalty closely associated with the Imperial family, usually in various symbolic colors, while it was a capital offense for anyone - other than the emperor himself - to ever use the completely gold-colored, five-clawed Long dragon motif. Improper use of claw number and/or colors was considered treason, punishable by execution of the offender's entire clan. Since most East Asian nations at one point or another were considered Chinese tributaries, they were only allowed four-clawed dragons.

j_ay said...

beautiful!

Mark McDonnell said...

Dude . . fuckin' BAD ASS . . this is beautiful man! Wow . . . great piece,

MAC

Lesley Vamos said...

Wow - really cool to see colour Eric! Love it ^_^

Munchanka said...

Great job with the sheen on the shoulder armor.